National Bonsai,Part 3: Fall Foliage

Hey Folks!  Its Danny, here with this months article.  I know, I know, this is a few days late to be my October post and I completely missed the September post.  Here’s the story, I took September off from the blog. This article will be post dated to October. However, I’ve also got a separate September make-up post that I expect to publish this month.  Additionally I’ll have a new post for November coming up in just a few weeks.  So if all goes as planned there could likely be 3 Tree The People post published this month.  Exciting, right?!

AutumnBonsaiSign

I’d like to share some photos from the ‘Fall Foliage’ exhibit at the National Bonsai & Penjing museum in Washington DC.  An annual exhibition with beginnings in the late 90s, under former museum curator Mr.Warren Hill.  For many people in the DC area, this show has turned into somewhat of a local autumn tradition.  There are currently 3 main collections and 1 sub-collection within the museum walls, Japanese, Chinese, North American and The Curators Collection, respectively.  This exhibition combines trees from all 4 collections into one cohesive display.  Tree preparation and exhibit set up comes together as a group effort from the museum staff and its team of volunteers, all orchestrated by museum curator Mr.Jack Sustic.  Due to the slightly unpredictable timing of trees showing fall color, the exhibit is different each year.  So if you made it or missed it this year, please plan to come check it out again or for the first time in the years to come.  Typically the event extends from the last week of October through the first week in November.  Never a disappointment.

ExibitsWing

In an effort to present this exhibition in an organized fashion, I’ll show 3 separate photos for each tree.  The order will go as follows, Label, Tree, Foliage.  The kusamono/accent plants do not have labels, however all kusamono/accent plants in this years exhibition are created by museum volunteer Young Choe.

Note about labels: In addition to the name of the tree and name of the trees donor, the bonsai labels also include the ‘In Training’ date.  This is the date that each tree began its life as a bonsai or as bonsai material, but not necessarily the true age of the tree.  In many cases, the tree is actually older than the ‘In Training’ date.  The difference is in trees that have been collected from a natural environment versus trees that have been cultivated as bonsai from seed.  The ‘In Training’ year does not include the possible decades of growth that a naturally occurring tree could have accumulated prior to collection and commencement of training.

On with the show.

American Beech

Beech-Label

American-Beech

AmericanBeech

Chinese-Quince

Quince-Label

Quince

Quince1

Chrysanthemum Stone

ChrysanthemumStone-Label

ChryStone

Trident Maple

TridentLabel

Trident1

TridentLeaf

Pomegranate

Pomegranate-Label

Persimon

PersiCloseUp

Ginkgo

Ginkgo-Label

Ginko

GinkgoLeaf

Shohin Display: Trident Maple, Celestial Pattern Stone, Accent Plant

Trident-Label

CelestialStone-label

ShohinMaple

Chinese Elm

Chinese-Elm-label2

ElmChinese

ChineseElm

Japanese Maple

Momiji-Label

Momiji

Momiji

Montezuma-Cypress

Montezuma-Label

Montezuma

Montezuma-Leaf

Bradford Pear & Accent plant

BradfordPear

BradfordPear

Bradford-Leaf

Toringo Crab Apple 

Toringo-Label

ToringoCrabApple

Tasty!

ToringoBerry

Cedar Elm

CedarElm-Label

Cedar-Elm

CedarElm-Leaf

Sweet Gum

Label photo coming soon…

SweetGum

SweetGum-Leaf

Drummond’s Red Maple

DrummondsRed-Label

Too Nice!

Too Nice!

Drummonds-Leaf

Beautiful from start to finish.  This is quite possibly my favorite autumn exhibition.  It’s a rare thing to see such a variety of species and styles from multiple geographic locations and cultures, synchronously slip into dormancy.

That’s it for this post, out of photos.  Thanks for reading!

until next time…

Danny